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Track Compendium

Bernhard Lichtberger

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Bernhard Lichtberger, Track Compendium (2011), PMC Media House, Bingen a. Rhein, ISBN: 9783962452148

Getrackt seit 05/2018

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Beschreibung / Abstract

Published at the beginning of September the second edition of “Track Compendium” provides an essential guide for railway track engineers and practitioners. The book describes clearly and compactly the physical properties of individual track components and their interrelationships.

This second edition contains several additional sections on the following topics:

Installation and maintenance of overhead line
Process control technology and safety technology
Head checks and the wear resistance of head-hardened rails
Equivalent conicity and running behaviour
Interaction of the vehicle with track geometry faults
Durability of wooden sleepers
Ballast bed cleaning and ballast properties

The author Bernhard Lichtberger has an experience of over more than 20 years of research in the field of track behaviour and the optimum methods of track maintenance. “Track Compendium” is for railway engineers a practical aid and an essential read for their daily business!

Inhaltsverzeichnis

  • Track Compendium
  • Acknowledgements and Preface
  • Introduction
  • Contents
  • 1 General information
  • 2 The track structure
  • 2.1 Track design considerations
  • 2.2 Static forces on the track
  • 2.3 Dynamic forces on the track
  • 2.4 Track resistance
  • 2.5 Track calculation
  • 2.6 Modern track design considering dynamic effects
  • 2.7 Stable support of the rails and sleepers
  • 2.8 Conclusions for track maintenance
  • 2.9 Maintenance techniques
  • 3 The rails
  • 3.1 Rail requirements
  • 3.2 Rail production
  • 3.3 Types of rails
  • 3.4 Chemical composition of rail steel
  • 3.5 Static hardness test
  • 3.6 Stress-strain diagram
  • 3.7 Rail branding
  • 3.8 Rail types
  • 3.9 Rail lengths
  • 3.10 Noise emission of rails
  • 3.11 Rail stress
  • 3.12 Quenching and tempering of rails
  • 3.13 Rail strength calculation
  • 3.14 Endurance resistance of rails
  • 3.15 Wear behaviour of wheel and rail steel
  • 3.16 Rail welding
  • 3.17 Laying, welding and tensioning of rails
  • 3.18 Rail defects
  • 3.19 Rail treatment in the track
  • 4 Rail fastenings
  • 4.1 The CEN standard on rail fastenings
  • 4.2 The purpose of the rail fastenings
  • 4.3 The effective forces
  • 4.4 Differences between rigid/elastic rail fastenings
  • 4.5 The rail pads
  • 4.6 The design of rail fastenings
  • 4.7 Checking the rail connections
  • 4.8 Checking rail fastenings by the GRMS track recording car
  • 5 The sleepers
  • 5.1 Comparison between wooden and concrete sleepers
  • 5.2 The purpose of sleepers
  • 5.3 Wooden sleepers
  • 5.4 Steel sleepers
  • 5.5 Reinforced concrete sleepers
  • 5.6 Sleeper calculation
  • 5.7 Resistance to lateral and longitudinal displacement
  • 6 Ballast and the ballast bed
  • 6.1 Ballast bed requirements
  • 6.2 Physical properties of ballast and shearing behaviour
  • 6.3 Ballast Cleaning
  • 6.4 Ballast bed dimensioning
  • 6.5 Restoration of the ballast bed
  • 6.6 Gluing of ballast
  • 7 The track formation
  • 7.1 General information on the bearing capacity of the track
  • 7.2 Drainage of the subsoil
  • 7.3 Reinforcement of the formation
  • 8 The subsoil
  • 8.1 Types of soils and their parameters
  • 8.2 Properties of soils
  • 8.3 Defects of the soil formation
  • 8.4 Reasons for damage to the soil formation
  • 8.5 Consequences of damage to the soil formation
  • 8.6 Ideal and poor soils
  • 8.7 Stress on the subsoil and its settlement behaviour
  • 8.8 Subsoil and earth structure deformations
  • 8.9 Load on the soil formation
  • 8.10 Geometrical requirements for the soil formation
  • 8.11 Soil analyses
  • 8.12 Soil improvement and compaction
  • 8.13 Chemical soil conversion
  • 8.14 Soil drainage
  • 8.15 Frost sensitivity of the subsoil
  • 9 Types of track
  • 9.1 Ballasted track
  • 9.2 In search of an optimum track structure
  • 9.3 How to produce track of highest initial quality
  • 9.4 Ballasted tracks with cross sleepers
  • 9.5 Ballasted track for high-speed lines
  • 10 Slab track
  • 10.1 Requirements of slab track
  • 10.2 Slab track in tunnels
  • 10.3 Slab track on earth structures
  • 10.4 Comparison between ballasted track and slab track
  • 10.5 Economic efficiency and cost of slab track
  • 10.6 Design types of slab track
  • 10.7 Comparison of overall heights of various designs of slab track
  • 10.8 Technical and economic comparison of the slab track designs
  • 11 Interaction between wheel and rail
  • 11.1 Dynamics of vehicle movement
  • 11.2 The contact between wheel and rail
  • 11.3 The influence of the rail/wheel contact geometry
  • 11.4 Vehicle defects
  • 11.5 Forces acting on the track due to dynamic wheel loads
  • 11.6 Rail vehicle noise
  • 11.7 Assessment and measurement of vehicle reactions
  • 11.8 The requirements to be met by vehicles for track
  • 11.9 The optimum vehicle
  • 11.10 Tilting trains
  • 11.11 Vehicle monitoring
  • 12 Turnouts
  • 12.1 The functions of turnouts, crossings and diamond crossings with slips
  • 12.2 The main types of turnouts, crossings and diamond crossings with slips
  • 12.3 Designation of turnouts
  • 12.4 Elements of turnouts
  • 12.5 The vibration-damped turnout with divided long bearers
  • 12.6 Geometric and structural characteristics of turnouts
  • 12.7 Schematic representation of turnouts
  • 12.8 Settlement behaviour of turnouts
  • 12.9 Maintenance of turnouts
  • 12.10 Rail adjustment switches
  • 13 Overhead line system
  • 13.1 Types of traction current
  • 13.2 Direct current systems (DC
  • 13.3 Alternating current systems (AC
  • 13.4 Catenary
  • 13.5 Air distances
  • 13.6 Various designs of overhead lines
  • 13.7 Structure of longitudinal catenary
  • 13.8 Return of traction current
  • 13.9 Permissible contact voltage
  • 13.10 Interaction between current collectors and overhead line
  • 14 Fundamentals on control and signalling in railway operation
  • 14.1 Block sections
  • 14.2 Track circuits
  • 14.2.1 Insulated rails
  • 14.2.2 Insulating joints
  • 14.3 Axle counters
  • 14.4 Intermittent automatic train control
  • 14.5 Continuous train control (CTC)
  • 14.6 The European rail traffic management system ERTMS
  • 14.7 Automatic train stop
  • 14.8 Hot box detection
  • 15 Track maintenance
  • 15.1 Typical maintenance cycles
  • 15.2 Standard values for maintenance and danger limits
  • 15.3 Accuracy of acceptance
  • 15.4 Considerations on track quality
  • 15.5 The choice of the optimum duration of track possessions
  • 15.6 Correction of track geometry
  • 15.7 Correction of rail defects
  • 15.8 Ballast bed treatment
  • 15.9 Subsoil improvement
  • 15.10 Laying and relaying of rails and sleepers
  • 15.11 Laying and transportation of turnouts
  • 15.12 Track construction cranes
  • 15.13 Maintenance of overhead lines
  • 16 Life cycle costs of railways
  • 16.1 UIC study comparing the life cycle costs (LCC) of railways
  • 16.2 Factors forcing up costs
  • 16.3 Cost saving potentials
  • 16.4 Differential LCC
  • 16.5 Track maintenance costs
  • 16.6 The effect of mechanisation on the economic efficiency of track maintenance
  • 16.7 Track access charges
  • Bibliography
  • Keywords
  • Advertisers' Index

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